When You Do Know What You Don’t (Want to) Know: Frederick Bourke and Conscious Avoidance

Add bookmark


We respect your privacy, by clicking "Download Your Copy" you will receive our e-newsletter, including information on Podcasts, Webinars, event discounts, online learning opportunities and agree to our User Agreement. You have the right to object . In addition, you agree to having your details passed onto the sponsor who may promote similar products and services related to your area of interest subject to their privacy policy. For further information on how we process and monitor your personal data click here. You can unsubscribe at any time.

The Legislative History of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) makes clear that Congress intended that the so-called "head-in-the-sand" defense—also described as "conscious disregard," "willful blindness" or "deliberate ignorance"—should be covered so that company officials could not take refuge from the Act's prohibitions by their unwarranted obliviousness to any action (or inaction), language or other "signaling device" that should reasonably alert them of the "high probability" of an FCPA violation.

LEARN MORE:

Have Your Say
Rate this feature and give us your feedback in the comments section below

RECOMMENDED